Veteran Employment Resources

VETV is committed to supporting our veterans. A big part of our mission is to provide veterans seeking employment with a variety of resources to aid in their search for employment.

 

Resume Writing

First ask yourself the following questions:

Did you improve processes? Did you expand the business?
Did you oversee a special project? Did you attract new customers?
Did you save the company money? Did you increase profitability or productivity?
Did you resolve a specific problem? Did you win any awards or receive any special recognition?
Did you exceed performance expectations? Did you take initiative?
Did you received any special recognition? Did you do anything better than anyone else could?
Did you make the company money? Did you earn a promotion?
Did you make the company more competitive? Did you go above and beyond?
Did you set yourself apart from others? Did you supervise employees?

In order to be successful, please clarify the following items for your resume:

  • Focused on a specific job or career field.
  • A clear overview of what you have accomplished.
  • An answer to the question, “What makes you qualified for this position?”
  • Tailored to fit the position you applied for.

Steps to accomplish the preparation:

Decide what type of job you are interested in. Your resume must clearly identify the type of job you want and the career field you want to work in. Be specific. If your resume is vague, the recruiter or hiring manager is not likely to call you.

Write down everything you can think of regarding your past work experience. Take your time to make sure you remember everything that you have done so far in your career. It does not have to be perfect at this time.

Write down everything that comes to mind. You can prioritize and word smith later. The purpose right now is to gather as much information as possible You should include the following

  • Previous jobs
  • Duties performed at each job
  • Skills used to perform the duties at each job
  • Highest level of education
  • Certificates / Licenses
  • Skills
  • Strengths
  • Accomplishments
  • Awards and recognition that you have received
  • Professional organizations of which you are a member
  • Volunteer Experience
  • Other skills

Now select the items that apply to the position or career you have selected.

The items you selected from your list will be the basis for your resume.

Category: Resume Writing

Goal of a resume is to land an interview.  Following are tips for success resume writing.

  1. Use active verbs in a telegraphic (verb first) style to describe the responsibilities you had in a particular job.
  2. The resume always has to reflect who you are so take suggestions from others and use what works for you.
  3. Always customize your resume for a particular job description. This would include the summary as well as the body of the resume. For some jobs you will highlight some responsibilities and some accomplishments and modify when applying for a different job.
  4. The resume should only be 2 pages at a maximum. Someone just graduating from school may only have 1 page.
  5. The body of the resume should be responsibilities and accomplishments. You should quantify both if possible.

6. Examples


Responsibilities

Managed the network department

Vs

Managed the Verizon network staff of 15 people with an annual budget of $750,000.  This is a much stronger statement.

Accomplishments

  • Reduced operating budget vs
  • Reduced operating budget from $1.2m to $750,000 while improving system up time to 98%.

7. Replace your Objective with Career Summary

8. Fonts Size Use 10 – 12 – Font Type – Use time tested font types such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Georgia

9. Margins Adequate “white space” on all four sides to create a clean and readable look.

  • Space for the interviewer to make notes on the page.
  • Fitting all the content on one page (when appropriate).
  • In most cases, margins should be no less than a half inch and no greater than 1¼ inches, depending on the format you choose.
Category: Resume Writing

DO

DO use spell check every time you update your resume. One simple typo can ruin your chances of getting hired.

Do modify your resume to reflect job description.

DO substitute passive words with action words.

DO use a dictionary to look up words if you are unsure of their meaning.

DO spell out words instead of using abbreviations.

DO be consistent:

  • If you capitalize one section heading, capitalize them all.
  • If you use bold font for one job title, use bold for all job titles.
  • If you double space between the first two jobs, double space between the second and third, and so forth.
  • Continue the same pattern throughout.

DO tailor your resume to the specific position you are applying for. For example: If you are applying for a management position, make sure the content of your resume is related to management.

If your resume focuses on customer service, but you are applying for a management job, you will not be considered for the position.

DO focus on accomplishments and successes, not just duties and responsibilities of your current and past employment.

DO be honest.

DO update your resume on a regular basis.

Do use positive thesaurus  –  http://www.positivethesaurus.com/p/positive-adjectives.html

Do ask someone to proofread your resume and cover letter

DON’T

Use personal pronouns (I, me, my)

Include personal information (race, age, marital status, or hobbies).

Include references

Exaggerate. This can be perceived as lying.

Include salary information.

 

 

Category: Resume Writing
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    Please review section of resume preparation before you begin to write your resume. Please review the Resume top 10 tips.

    Sections of a Resume Includes:

    1. Contact Information
    2. Resume Statement
    3. Resume Objective
    4. Career Summary
    5. Work Experience – Body of the resume
    6. Education
    7. Optional Sections
    8. Skills
    9. Accomplishments
    10. Honors and Awards
    11. Professional Associations/Volunteer Experience

    John Smith

    4211 Wayward Drive

    Marietta, Ga. 300066

    770-551-5512

    John.Smith@gmail.com

    www.linkedin.com/JSmith

    Professional Summary

    Summarize your background and qualifications in terms of how they can benefit the employer and the job in no more than about three sentences or bullet points. Refer to and use words included in the job description.

    1. Work Experience, or Skills and Abilities.
    2. With a chronological resume, list work experience in reverse order to make recent experience the most relevant.
    3. With a functional resume, organize skills and abilities by type. For example, include subsections such as “Accounting,” “Organization and Planning” and “Customer Service and Support.”

    Body of resume: What does it look like?

    Keep the following statement in the front of your mind:

    1. This section must be relevant to your target position.
    2. You should modify your responsibilities and accomplishments to reflect the job description.
    3. Include the following information for each of your previous employers:
    • Company name, Job title, Location (city and state), Employment dates (start date and end date in MM/YYYY format). If there are gaps in your employment dates, be prepared to explain them in a job interview (or explain them in your cover letter).
    • Major accomplishments and results that you have achieved at each of your previous jobs. Use bullet points. Paragraphs are acceptable. However, I highly recommend bullet points because they are easier to follow.

    For each job…

    1. Start each bullet point with an action word. Action words give the impression that you will take initiative.
    2. State major accomplishments and results.
    3. List the most important accomplishments first.
    4. Exclude information that is not relevant to the job you want.
    5. Use bold font for job titles and/or company names.
    6. Sprinkle in keywords from the job description so that you are speaking the employer’s language.

    If you held more than one position at the same company, list each job title separately under the company name, and follow each job title with its own bullet points.

    Be specific about accomplishments and results

    Your goal is to tell the hiring manager what you accomplished during your prior work experience, and the results of your efforts. Show them how you can apply your work experience to add value to their organization. This section must reflect your accomplishments and results. Be specific.

    • Accomplishment = Streamlined processes
    • Result= 15% reduction in claim processing time
    • Accomplishment = Answered 90% of calls within 30 seconds
    • Result = 10% higher than performance expectations

    These examples show proven results – exactly what the hiring manager wants to see. They tell the employer that you will perform better than what is expected of you.

    Say it with…Numbers

    • 6 years of experience implementing wholesale marketing plans for two Fortune 500 corporations.
    • Received statewide recognition for exceeding sales quotas by 40%.
    • Consistently exceeded audit goals by 20% for the last 3 years.
    • Recruited, trained, and motivated 40-member marketing team at 3 locations.
    • Built client base of 230 customers, which is the highest in the company.

    Percentages

    • Restructured claims approval process, which decreased processing time by 20%.
    • Reduced product costs by 10%, while consistently adding improved product features.
    • Decreased travel expenses by 40% through monthly account reconciliation techniques.

    Dollar amounts

    • Initiated claims investigation which resulted in the recovery of $150,000 insurance overpayments.
    • Decreased advertising costs by $12,000 per year through the negotiation of cost-effective contracts.
    • Saved the organization $6,000 using thorough data analysis and system upgrades.
    • Words like “first, only, best, most, highest.”
    • Only sales representative in the company to reach $100,000 in sales in one calendar year.
    • Motivated a team of 25 customer service representatives to achieve highest call center service levels in the Midwest area, 2 years in a row.
    • recruiter to hire over 65 qualified candidates in one quarter.

    Preparing and writing a resume is work. It is worth your time and effort to make it your best effort and the best representation of who you are. Good luck with your job search.

    Category: Resume Writing

    Here are steps to help you to write a cover letter.

    1. Add a letterhead at the top of the letter. Your letterhead should include your full name, address, telephone number, and email address. Some guidelines to follow when creating your letterhead:
      • Your name should be in bold 14- or 16-point font.
      • Your address and other contact information should be in normal 12-point font.
      • The font of your letterhead does not need to be Arial or Times New Roman, like the rest of your letter, but it should be professional looking and easy to read. The most important thing to remember is to include up-to-date information so that you make it easy for the employer to contact you.
      • You may want to include an extra line under the letterhead to create visual appeal and to separate the letterhead from the rest of the letter.
    1. Write the recipient’s name, address, and the date below the letterhead. It doesn’t matter whether you put the date first or last, or how many blank lines you include between them, as long as it looks professional.
      • From here on out, use 12-point Arial or Times New Roman throughout the entire letter, set your margins to one inch, and use single spacing. Be sure your font is black, and if you’re printing your letter out, use standard-sized paper (8 1/2” by 11”).
    1. Address the recipient. Be sure to refer to the recipient by his or her proper title (Mrs., Mr., Dr., etc.). If you’re not sure who the recipient is, write, “To Whom It May Concern:” or “Dear Sir or Madam”; however, it is always best to address a cover letter to a real person to make it look like you’re not sending form letters.
    2. State your purpose in the first paragraph. Tell the employer why you are writing to them in two or three sentences. State the position for which you are applying (or the one you would like to have should it become available).
      • You don’t necessarily need to include how you became aware of the position unless it was through a mutual contact or recruiting program—in which case you should make the most of the connection.
      • If you are writing a letter of interest (also known as a prospecting or inquiry letter) in which you are asking about positions that might be available, specify why you are interested in working for the employer.
    1. Outline your qualifications in the middle paragraph(s). Make sure to match them to the requirements of the position. If you are writing to inquire about open positions, tell the employer how you can contribute to their bottom line, not what you want to get out of the deal. To do this, use what you have researched about the employer’s background and history.
      • Make your qualifications jump out at the reader by researching the company to which you are applying for a job and tailoring your letter accordingly. This will also be useful if you get an interview. Some questions to keep in mind as you write are
        • What is the employer’s mission? What do they promote as the one thing that sets them apart from their competitors?
        • What kind of customer base does the employer have? Who is their target audience?
        • What is the company’s history? Who founded it? How has the business evolved? What are the main highlights of the company’s performance over the past few years?
    1. Include a positive statement or question in the final paragraph that will motivate the employer to contact you. Make this closing paragraph between two to four sentences. Direct the employer to your enclosed resume and make sure you specify that you’re available for an interview. Finish off by thanking the recruiter for their time and consideration, and welcome them to get in touch with you to continue the conversation.
    1.  “Respectfully,” or “Regards,” leave several spaces, and print your name.
    1. Add your signature. If you will be submitting your cover letter digitally, it’s a good idea to scan and add your signature, write it in with a digital writing pad, or make a digital signature stamp with appropriate software.
    2. Make a notation of the enclosures. If you enclose something, such as a resume, with a letter, you should indicate that the letter contains enclosures by making the notation “Enclosure” or “Enclosures” at the bottom of the letter.

    Review Your Cover Letter

    1. Spell-check
    2. Read your letter aloud to hear how it reads.

    Checklist for Preparing Your Cover Letter

    1. Double-check some of the most-overlooked basics before you do anything. While misspelling or misidentifying the name of the company you’re applying to isn’t the end of the world, it’s not exactly starting off on the right foot. Double-check the following:
      • The complete name of the company to which you are applying for a job
      • The name of the person to whom you are addressing the cover letter
      • The address of the person to whom you are sending the letter
      • The title of the job for which you are applying and/or its reference number, if it exists

     

    1. Ask yourself what skills do you possess that you are not using enough in your current role. Would the ideal candidate for this new role be required to make more use of those types of skills? What opportunities are missing in your current role? Answering these questions will help you explain why you are interested in leaving current position. For example, are you looking for:
      • “room for advancement”
      • “an opportunity to learn new skills”

     

    1. Hammer down your current job or educational position. This may seem like an obvious question, but knowing how to clearly define your current role is a tremendous asset. For example, you could be a:
      • “graduate student in environmental science”
      • “customer service professional specializing in the high-end retail market”

     

    1. Provide a general description of your accomplishments/experiences in the field to which you are applying. For example, you could have:
      • “fifteen years of excellent customer service experience”
      • “an outstanding background in scientific research and discovery”
      • “a solid history of dependability in the automotive industry”
    1. Identify the assets can you offer to the company to which you are applying. List a few in your cover letter, such as:
      • “extensive experience with start-ups”
      • “demonstrated ability to solve problems”
      • “refined ability to manage teams”
      • What will you help the company accomplish, if given the job you desire?
      • “increase its bottom line”
      • “meet its goal of providing only the best in customer service”
      • “expand its customer base and increase its revenue”
    1. Specify the type of job or level of the position you are seeking. Is it:
      • “entry-level”
      • “management”
      • “senior level”

     

    Category: Resume Writing

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    Job Interview

    Preparation

    1. Confirm date and time of interview
    2. Understand names and titles of those that will interview you
    3. Research Company – Visit company web site and research on internet
    4. Understand companies market and financial position
    5. Research people who will interview you
    6. Talk with other employees at company or others in the industry with similar jobs – You can find them through company name and linkedin.
    7. Talk to others in industry and determine skills and talents that are needed for this position
    8. Read job description and be prepared to talk about your experience and skills that apply to this particular job.
    9. Hold practice interview with friend or peer in industry
    10. Tape practice interview
    11. Review tape and ask for feedback from person giving you practice interview
    12. In preparation think about what you would like to accomplish in this position in the first 30 – 60 or 90 days if you were hired. Most people being interviewed have not taken this step. Then use your answer during the interview. The next level of preparation would be to put down these plans in writing and use as part of your interview.
    13. Be prepared not scared
    14. If unfamiliar with the area of business, visit location in advance of the interview
    15. Get good nights sleep
    Category: Interview

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    Dress and appearance

    1. Dress appropriately which should be conservative business attire
    2. Shine shoes
    3. Get haircut
    Category: Interview

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    The Interview

    1. Be on time
    2. Bring extra copies of your resume
    3. Bring list of references and all their contact information
    4. Greet the person with smile and a good hand shake while looking them in the eye.
    5. Listen to the question asked. Make sure you know what the interviewer wants to know. Ask for clarification if the question is not clear.
    1. Keep your answers concise and to the point — two to three minutes long.
    2. Make sure you are selling the product: You.
    3. Have questions prepared to ask the interviewer.
    Category: Interview

    Writing a thank you letter, or thank you email, after an employment interview is a must. In fact, some employers even think less of those interviewees who fail to follow-up promptly. Plan to send out your thank you letters and or thank you notes as soon as possible after your interview. The same day is recommended.

    Do send out email thank you.

    1. Do send out thank you letter by email and mail.
    2. Please send both out the same day as your interview. By sending out thanks my email and mail you will stand out from the crowd. If you skip step 1 and 2, then you should not expect a job offer.
    3. If you have poor handwriting, then please type thank you and sign.
    4. Fonts Size – Use 10 – 12
    5. Font Type – Use standard font types such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Georgia
    6. Write a knockout thank-you note; it may make a difference.
    7. Four things to cover in thank you:
      1. Thank the person for meeting with you
      2. Mention something you liked about the interview
      3. Reference the discussion you had during the interview to show that you listen well and that understood what they need. Reference the skills you have and how they make you an excellent candidate for the job.
      4. Repeat your interest in the job and reiterate your appreciation for being considered for the job and let the hiring manager know you are looking forward to hearing from him or her soon.
    8. Run spell check to ensure no spelling errors.
    9. Proof your mail and email. Read your note and ask yourself: Could someone who didn’t even participate in the interview have written this? If the answer is yes, then try again. It should never be that generic.

    Format for Thank Your letter


    Date

    Contact Information: (Your contact information) Your Name Your Address Your City, State, Zip Code Your Phone Number Your Email Address

    Contact Information: (The person you are writing to) Name Title Company Address City, State, Zip Code

    Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name:

    1. Thank the person for meeting with you
    2. Mention something you liked about the interview
    3. Reference the discussion you had during the interview to show that you listen well and that understood what they need. Reference the skills you have and how they make you an excellent candidate for the job.
    4. Repeat your interest in the job and reiterate your appreciation for being considered for the job and let the hiring manager know you are looking forward to hearing from him or her soon.

    Best regards,

    Handwritten Signature (for a mailed letter)

    Typed Signature

    Category: Interview

    Getting Started Questions

    • How would you go about establishing your credibility quickly with the team?
    • How long will it take for you to make a significant contribution?
    • What do you see yourself doing within the first 30 days of this job?
    • If selected for this position, can you describe your strategy for the first 90 days?

    Interview Questions About You

    • Tell me about yourself.
    • What is your greatest strength?
    • What is your greatest weakness?
    • Tell me about something that’s not on your resume.
    • How will your greatest strength help you perform?
    • How do you handle failure?
    • How do you handle success?
    • Do you consider yourself successful? Why?
    • How do you handle stress and pressure?
    • How would you describe yourself?
    • Describe a typical work week.
    • Are you nice?
    • Describe your work style.
    • Do you work well with other people?
    • Do you take work home with you?
    • How are you different from the competition?
    • How do you view yourself? Whom do you compare yourself to?
    • How does this job fit in with your career plan?
    • How many hours a week do you normally work?
    • How would you adjust to working for a new company?
    • How would you describe the pace at which you work?
    • How would your co-workers describe your personality?
    • Is there anything else we should know about you?
    • -What motivates you?
    • Are you a self motivator?
    • What do you find are the most difficult decisions to make?
    • What has been the greatest disappointment in your life?
    • What are you passionate about?
    • What are your hobbies?
    • What are your pet peeves?
    • What is your dream job?
    • What will you miss most about your last job?
    • What won’t you miss about your last job?
    • Would you rather be liked or respected?
    • Why should I take a risk on you?
    • If you could relive the last 10 years of your life, what would you do differently?

     

    Behavioral Interview Questions

    • What was the last project you led, and what was its outcome?
    • Give me an example of a time that you felt you went above and beyond the call of duty at work.
    • Can you describe a time when your work was criticized?
    • Have you ever been on a team where someone was not pulling their own weight? How did you handle it?
    • Tell me about a time when you had to give someone difficult feedback. How did you handle it?
    • What is your greatest failure, and what did you learn from it?
    • How do you handle working with people who annoy you?
    • If I were your supervisor and asked you to do something that you disagreed with, what would you do?
    • What was the most difficult period in your life, and how did you deal with it?
    • Give me an example of a time you did something wrong. How did you handle it?
    • Tell me about a time where you had to deal with conflict on the job.
    • If you were at a business lunch and you ordered a rare steak and they brought it to you well done, what would you do?
    • If you found out your company was doing something against the law, like fraud, what would you do?
    • What assignment was too difficult for you, and how did you resolve the issue?
    • What’s the most difficult decision you’ve made in the last two years and how did you come to that decision?
    • Describe how you would handle a situation if you were required to finish multiple tasks by the end of the day, and there was no conceivable way that you could finish them.

    Questions About Leaving Your Job

    Employers almost always ask about why you left, or are leaving, your job. Be prepared with an explanation for why you’re moving on.

    • Why are you leaving your job?
    • Why do you want to change jobs?
    • Why were you fired?
    • Why were you laid-off?
    • Why did you quit your job?
    • Why did you resign?
    • What have you been doing since your last job?
    • Why have you been out of work so long?

    Interview Questions About Salary

    Some of the hardest questions to answer during a job interview are about compensation.

    Here’s what you will be asked and examples of the best answers.

    • What were your starting and final levels of compensation?
    • What are your salary expectations?
    • What are your salary requirements?
    • Why would you take a job for less money?

    Questions About Qualifications

    The most important thing for interviewers to determine is whether you’re qualified for the job. Here’s what they will ask to find out.

    • What applicable experience do you have?
    • Are you overqualified for this job?
    • How did you impact the bottom line?
    • Interview questions about your abilities.
    • What can you do better for us than the other candidates for the job?
    • What part of the job will be the least challenging for you?
    • Which parts of this job are the most challenging for you?
    • What philosophy guides your work?
    • What strength will help you the most to succeed?
    • Why are you interested in taking a lower level job?
    • Why are you interested in a non-management job?

    Questions About Job Performance

    How you performed in previous roles can indicate how you will perform in the job for which you’re applying. Be prepared to answer questions about what you did well – and what you didn’t.

    • What do people most often criticize about you?
    • What is the biggest criticism you received from your boss?
    • What is the worst thing that you have ever gotten away with?
    • What makes you angry?
    • What problems have you encountered at work?
    • What strategies would you use to motivate your team?
    • What would you be looking for in an applicant?
    • When was the last time you were angry? What happened?
    • Why weren’t you promoted at your last job?
    • Tell me about something you would have done differently at work
    • If the people who know you were asked why you should be hired, what would they say?
    • What type of work environment do you prefer?
    • How do you evaluate success?
    • Describe a difficult work situation / project and how you overcame it.
    • Describe a time when your workload was heavy and how you handled it.

    Interview Questions About Your Work History

    Is your work history stable, has it prepared you for the job you’re interviewing for, and do you have any gaps in your employment history that the company should be concerned about? Here’s what you’ll be asked about.

    • Questions about your work history.
    • Questions about your resume.
    • What were your expectations for the job and to what extent were they met?
    • What were your responsibilities?
    • What major challenges and problems did you face? How did you handle them?
    • What have you learned from your mistakes?
    • What did you like or dislike about your previous job?
    • Which was most / least rewarding?
    • What was the biggest accomplishment / failure in this position?
    • Questions about job demotions.
    • How have you impacted worker safety?
    • Describe the gap in your employment history.

    Questions About Management and Teamwork

    How you get along with others, including both co-workers and managers, is important to all employers. Here are some of the questions employers ask about getting along at work.

    • Who was your best boss and who was the worst?
    • Describe your ideal boss.
    • If you know your boss is 100% wrong about something how would you handle it?
    • What do you expect from a supervisor?
    • Have you ever had difficulty working with a manager?
    • How did you fit in with the company culture?
    • Describe how you managed a problem employee.
    • Do you prefer to work independently or on a team?
    • Give some examples of teamwork.
    • More teamwork interview questions.

    Questions About Why You Should Be Hired

    Why should you be hired over the other candidates? Here’s when you’ll have the opportunity to make the case for getting a job offer.

    • Why should we hire you?
    • Why shouldn’t we hire you?
    • Why should we hire you instead of the other applicants for the job?
    • Why are you the best person for the job?
    • What can you contribute to this company?

    Interview Questions About the New Job and the Company

    What do you know about the company, why do you want the job, and what would you do if you were to be hired, are just some of the questions you’ll be asked about the position and employer.

    • How is our company better than your current employer?
    • What interests you about this job?
    • What do you know about this company?
    • Why do you want this job?
    • Why do you want to work here?
    • What challenges are you looking for in a position?
    • What can we expect from you in the first 60 days on the job?
    • What do you see yourself doing within the first 30 days on the job?
    • Are you willing to travel?
    • What is good customer service?
    • What would be your ideal company culture?
    • When could you start work?
    • Is there anything I haven’t told you about the job or company that you would like to know?

    Interview Questions About the Future

    Are you going to stick around if you’re hired is something most employers want to know. All these questions will gauge your interest in making a commitment.

    • What are you looking for in your next job? What is important to you?
    • What is your professional development plan?
    • Where do you see yourself 5 years from now?
    • Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
    • What are your goals for the next five years / ten years?
    • How do you plan to achieve your goals?
    • What will you do if you don’t get this position?
    • Where else are you interviewing?

    Career Development Questions

    • What are you looking for in terms of career development?
    • How do you want to improve yourself in the next year?
    • What kind of goals would you have in mind if you got this job?
    • If I were to ask your last supervisor to provide you additional training or exposure, what would she suggest?

    Behavioral Interview Questions
    In addition to being ready to answer these standard questions, prepare for behavior-based interview questions. This is based on the premise that a candidate’s past performance is the best predictor of future performance. You will need to be prepared to provide detailed responses including specific examples of your work experiences.

    Interview Questions Employers Should Not Ask
    There are some interview questions, typically known as illegal interview questions, that employers should not ask during a job interview. Here are questions that shouldn’t be asked during a job interview and how to best respond.

    Phone Job Interview Questions
    Have a phone interview on the agenda? Here are common questions asked during a telephone interview, plus tips on how best to answer so you can move to the next stage of the interview process.

    Interview Questions to Ask
    The last job interview question you may be asked is “What can I answer for you?” Have an interview question or two of your own ready to ask. You aren’t simply trying to get this job – you are also interviewing the employer to assess whether this company and the position are a good fit for you.

    Category: Interview

    Networking

    1. Start off networking with your existing connections. Locate who you want to talk to. As a professional, or an aspiring professional, your time is important. Be discerning and selective.
    2. Be confident to inspire confidence in you.
    3. Have your elevator pitch prepared. An elevator pitch is a personal blurb that sums up the “professional you” and can be delivered quickly.
    4. Learn the art of small talk. Having a great conversation often starts with a little bit of back-and-forth. It’s an opportunity for you to get a feel for the other person, and for them to get a feel for you.
    5. Set yourself apart by thinking before you speak. In normal conversation, it’s common to build up a flow of conversation and to fear the dreaded awkward pause. But when you’re worried about constantly keeping up the flow of conversation, you often forget about listening to what the other person has to say and formulating an intelligent response.
    6. Don’t be afraid to take a second or two to pause and think about what you’re going to say before you say it. This one or two seconds feels a lot longer to you. If something intelligent comes out of your mouth afterwards, that investment was worth it.
    7. Find out who knows whom. When you’re talking to people, find out what they do for a living and for fun, as well as what their spouse or significant other, nearby family members, and close friends do for work and recreation, too. It may be helpful to make note of this in your address book so you don’t lose track of who does what.
    8. If all goes well, ask for their business card and assure them you’d like to continue the conversation. Once you’ve had a pleasant chat, exchanged viewpoints, or commiserated over a horrible boss, don’t be afraid to say that you’ve enjoyed the conversation. Offer something like: “I’m glad we talked. You seem like a very knowledgeable and respected person. How about we continue the conversation soon?”
    9. Tell your stories. One great way to brand yourself as a worthy hire during networking events is to tell stories. Pick three good stories from your life, personal or work-related, and share what you learned from the experiences, Roach said. A good story can illustrate multiple positive aspects about you as a person and as a potential employee.
    10. Write thank-you notes. Within 24 hours of the event, write a thank-you note to each recruiter or manager you met. Be sure to reference any specific points or connections you made during your conversations with them so they remember who you are.

    Category: Networking

     


    First time users in Linkedin


    1. Create your profile
    2. Add a head shot of you. If possible it should be in a professional setting and appropriate dress.
    3. Headline
      1. The headline is very important to get the attention of recruiters or employers, so give this some thought and make it memorable. Have a clear statement of who you are and state your specialty.
      2. Create a compelling and unique headline. The default headline is your current job title.
      3. When employers run a LinkedIn search, the results that appear include name, photo and headline.
      4. This is the place to use important keywords and a short version of your elevator speech. Need to be very concise.
    4. Create a Summary
      1. Create a detailed profile summary that gives a glimpse into who you are. The intent is to write a summary that answers the needs for a particular job or industry.
    5. Enter your work history. Make sure responsibilities and accomplishments appeal to hiring manager for position you would like to get.
    6. Review the skills that are available. Select the ones that are appropriate for your job or industry.
    7. Complete the other sections in the profile as is appropriate.
    8. Remember this is important. Your LinkedIn profile will be seen by HR and recruiters. This is also a lot of work so not necessary to complete all in one sitting.
    9. Now that you have created your profile it is time to find connections. The first step is to find a friendly market. Send out requests to friends and family. Once you get to 50 friends, then LinkedIn will start to send you suggestions for connections. I know that sounds like a lot at first, but with a little effort, you will quickly get to 50.
    10. One of the next steps is to reach out to your work or alumni connections and ask for connections and or endorsements. Ultimately you are trying to build and improve your score for your LinkedIn site
    11. Now that you have built your LinkedIn site, it is time to join groups. Sign up for groups for your industry or where you have an interest. Once you are established your goal is to be active on these sites as well as your own LinkedIn site. Activity promotes the interest in you and improves your score. The goal is to be noticed and to potentially get an invitation to apply for a job.
    12. Now that you are established, check out the competition and determine if you need to enhance your profile. Plagiarism, the Sincerest Form of Flattery.
    13. Now that you are well established in LinkedIn, you need to stay active whether on your own link or in the groups where you have an interest. You can comment on articles or ongoing discussions. You can post your ideas based on an article you read. All these activities give you a chance for exposure. Whether you are looking for a job or perhaps to find a job that offers more money or a promotion, all these things on LinkedIn provide that opportunity.

    Existing users in LinkedIn


    1. Update all the sections in the profile as is appropriate.
    2. If appropriate update your head shot photo. If possible it should be in a professional setting and appropriate dress and a current picture.
    3. Rewrite or update your headline
      1. This is the first thing people will see on your profile.
      2. The headline is very important to get the attention of recruiters or employers so give this some thought and make it memorable. Have a clear statement of who you are and state your specialty.
      3. When employers run a LinkedIn search, the results that appear include name, photo and headline.
      4. This is the place to use important keywords and a short version of your elevator speech. Need to be very concise because space is limited.
    4. Update your summary if appropriate
      1. This should be a detailed profile summary that gives a glimpse into who you are. The intent is to write a summary that answers the needs for a particular job or industry.
    5. Update your work history. Make sure responsibilities and accomplishments appeal to hiring manager for position you would like to get.
    6. Review the skills that are available. Select the ones that are appropriate for your job or industry. Update your LinkedIn site and or post to your groups. This gives the opportunity for a much larger audience to showcase your skills, talents, knowledge, and creativity. Eliminate entries that are not significant to your career and business.
    7. Remember this is important. Your LinkedIn profile will be seen by HR and recruiters and potential clients. There is pay back in the time you spend on LinkedIn. Whether you are contacted for a possible position, a new client or you applied directly for a position, the HR and Recruiters and clients will review your LinkedIn profile.
    8. If you have not already done it, then send out requests to friends and family. Once you have gotten past 50 friends, then LinkedIn will start to send you suggestions for connections. You should reach out to your co-workers or alumni connections and ask for endorsements. Ultimately you are trying to build and improve your score for your LinkedIn site. You can also reach out to clients and or peers to ask for recommendation.
    9. If you have not already done so, sign up for groups for your industry or where you have an interest. Once you are established, your goal is to be active on these sites as well as your own LinkedIn site. Activity promotes the interest in you and raises your score. The goal is to be noticed and to potentially get an invitation to apply for a job.
    10. Now that you are well established in LinkedIn, you need to stay active whether on your own link or in the groups where you have an interest. You can comment on articles or ongoing discussions. You can post your ideas based on an article you read. All these activities give you exposure. Whether you are looking for a job or perhaps to find a job that offers more money or a promotion, or to find new clients, LinkedIn provides that opportunity.
    11. Connect with all of your current clients with Just a brief note of contact and thanks will suffice. They are hands down your best source of referrals. Send out updates or notes to them on a regular basis.
    12. Now that you are established, check out the competition and determine if you need to enhance your profile. Plagiarism, the Sincerest Form of Flattery.
    13. There’s a section devoted to describing your volunteer experience, what role you played and what the cause was, along with a place to write a detailed description. You can also type in specific opportunities you’re looking for, such as joining a nonprofit board. You can also include causes you care about.
    14. Periodically ask ex-colleagues, previous bosses and clients to write recommendations on your profile.
    15. List recent certifications and courses on your LinkedIn profile.

    Free one year subscription to Linkedin

    https://veterans.linkedin.com/


    Category: Networking

    More job seekers find new employment through job networking than through all other sources combined. Everyone is a networking contact. Everyone you meet in your job search will want to help you in your job search.  All you have to do is reach out and tell them how.

    With those three principles in mind, compose your networking communications speech – then practice it until you can easily recite it whenever you have a networking opportunity.

    1. What is your background? (not more than 15 seconds)
    My name is _____________, and I have experience in [your industry or discipline].  Most recently, I have been with _________________, where I did [your duties/responsibilities, and add some accomplishments or achievements if possible].  [You may wish to mention here other significant data, e.g. academics or certifications.]

    1. What is your job objective?  (Clear and concise; five seconds should be enough.)
      Currently I am seeking ___________________.
    2. Most importantly, what information do you want from this person or group?  (another five seconds, and be specific.)  For example:
    • “If you know of anyone in my field with whom I could network, I would like to speak with you.”
    • “Two of my target companies are _____ and _______. Do you have any connections there?”
    • “I recently have found an opening with [name of company] that I am interested in pursuing.  If you know of anyone with that company or have information about the company, I would like to speak with you.”
    • “Do you know of any recruiters that specialize in my field?”
    • Do not ask a general question such as, “Do you have any suggestions for my job search?” You are not likely to receive any response, but instead ask for specific information.

     

    Category: Networking

    Job Search

    Commercial Web Sites:

    Indeed

    LinkedIn

    Monster

    CareerBuilder

    Glass Door

    Nonprofit Job Postings

    Opportunity Knocks

    Contract and Temp Agencies:

    Net-Temps

    BestJobs USA

    Recruiters Online Network

    Resume Spider

    Hispanic bilingual recruiters:

    Aldebaran Associates and Blue Star Staffing Solutions

    For upper-level executives:
    Netshare fee based

    Job sites for seniors (50+ age):

    SeniorJobBank,

    Seniors4Hire,

    Retirement Jobs,

     

    Category: Job Search
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