Veteran Employment Resources

VETV is committed to supporting our veterans. A big part of our mission is to provide veterans seeking employment with a variety of resources to aid in their search for employment.

 

Resume Writing

First ask yourself the following questions:

Did you improve processes? Did you expand the business?
Did you oversee a special project? Did you attract new customers?
Did you save the company money? Did you increase profitability or productivity?
Did you resolve a specific problem? Did you win any awards or receive any special recognition?
Did you exceed performance expectations? Did you take initiative?
Did you received any special recognition? Did you do anything better than anyone else could?
Did you make the company money? Did you earn a promotion?
Did you make the company more competitive? Did you go above and beyond?
Did you set yourself apart from others? Did you supervise employees?

In order to be successful, please clarify the following items for your resume:

  • Focused on a specific job or career field.
  • A clear overview of what you have accomplished.
  • An answer to the question, “What makes you qualified for this position?”
  • Tailored to fit the position you applied for.

Steps to accomplish the preparation:

Decide what type of job you are interested in. Your resume must clearly identify the type of job you want and the career field you want to work in. Be specific. If your resume is vague, the recruiter or hiring manager is not likely to call you.

Write down everything you can think of regarding your past work experience. Take your time to make sure you remember everything that you have done so far in your career. It does not have to be perfect at this time.

Write down everything that comes to mind. You can prioritize and word smith later. The purpose right now is to gather as much information as possible You should include the following

  • Previous jobs
  • Duties performed at each job
  • Skills used to perform the duties at each job
  • Highest level of education
  • Certificates / Licenses
  • Skills
  • Strengths
  • Accomplishments
  • Awards and recognition that you have received
  • Professional organizations of which you are a member
  • Volunteer Experience
  • Other skills

Now select the items that apply to the position or career you have selected.

The items you selected from your list will be the basis for your resume.

Category: Resume Writing

Goal of a resume is to land an interview.  Following are tips for success resume writing.

  1. Use active verbs in a telegraphic (verb first) style to describe the responsibilities you had in a particular job.
  2. The resume always has to reflect who you are so take suggestions from others and use what works for you.
  3. Always customize your resume for a particular job description. This would include the summary as well as the body of the resume. For some jobs you will highlight some responsibilities and some accomplishments and modify when applying for a different job.
  4. The resume should only be 2 pages at a maximum. Someone just graduating from school may only have 1 page.
  5. The body of the resume should be responsibilities and accomplishments. You should quantify both if possible.

6. Examples


Responsibilities

Managed the network department

Vs

Managed the Verizon network staff of 15 people with an annual budget of $750,000.  This is a much stronger statement.

Accomplishments

  • Reduced operating budget vs
  • Reduced operating budget from $1.2m to $750,000 while improving system up time to 98%.

7. Replace your Objective with Career Summary

8. Fonts Size Use 10 – 12 – Font Type – Use time tested font types such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Georgia

9. Margins Adequate “white space” on all four sides to create a clean and readable look.

  • Space for the interviewer to make notes on the page.
  • Fitting all the content on one page (when appropriate).
  • In most cases, margins should be no less than a half inch and no greater than 1¼ inches, depending on the format you choose.
Category: Resume Writing

DO

DO use spell check every time you update your resume. One simple typo can ruin your chances of getting hired.

Do modify your resume to reflect job description.

DO substitute passive words with action words.

DO use a dictionary to look up words if you are unsure of their meaning.

DO spell out words instead of using abbreviations.

DO be consistent:

  • If you capitalize one section heading, capitalize them all.
  • If you use bold font for one job title, use bold for all job titles.
  • If you double space between the first two jobs, double space between the second and third, and so forth.
  • Continue the same pattern throughout.

DO tailor your resume to the specific position you are applying for. For example: If you are applying for a management position, make sure the content of your resume is related to management.

If your resume focuses on customer service, but you are applying for a management job, you will not be considered for the position.

DO focus on accomplishments and successes, not just duties and responsibilities of your current and past employment.

DO be honest.

DO update your resume on a regular basis.

Do use positive thesaurus  –  http://www.positivethesaurus.com/p/positive-adjectives.html

Do ask someone to proofread your resume and cover letter

DON’T

Use personal pronouns (I, me, my)

Include personal information (race, age, marital status, or hobbies).

Include references

Exaggerate. This can be perceived as lying.

Include salary information.

 

 

Category: Resume Writing
  • I see you don’t monetize your blog, don’t waste your traffic, you can earn extra bucks every month because you’ve got
    hi quality content. If you want to know how to make extra money, search for: Boorfe’s tips best adsense alternative

  • I think your website needs some fresh articles. Writing manually takes a lot of time, but
    there is tool for this boring task, search for; Ssundee
    advices unlimited content for any blog

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Please review section of resume preparation before you begin to write your resume. Please review the Resume top 10 tips.

    Sections of a Resume Includes:

    1. Contact Information
    2. Resume Statement
    3. Resume Objective
    4. Career Summary
    5. Work Experience – Body of the resume
    6. Education
    7. Optional Sections
    8. Skills
    9. Accomplishments
    10. Honors and Awards
    11. Professional Associations/Volunteer Experience

    John Smith

    4211 Wayward Drive

    Marietta, Ga. 300066

    770-551-5512

    John.Smith@gmail.com

    www.linkedin.com/JSmith

    Professional Summary

    Summarize your background and qualifications in terms of how they can benefit the employer and the job in no more than about three sentences or bullet points. Refer to and use words included in the job description.

    1. Work Experience, or Skills and Abilities.
    2. With a chronological resume, list work experience in reverse order to make recent experience the most relevant.
    3. With a functional resume, organize skills and abilities by type. For example, include subsections such as “Accounting,” “Organization and Planning” and “Customer Service and Support.”

    Body of resume: What does it look like?

    Keep the following statement in the front of your mind:

    1. This section must be relevant to your target position.
    2. You should modify your responsibilities and accomplishments to reflect the job description.
    3. Include the following information for each of your previous employers:
    • Company name, Job title, Location (city and state), Employment dates (start date and end date in MM/YYYY format). If there are gaps in your employment dates, be prepared to explain them in a job interview (or explain them in your cover letter).
    • Major accomplishments and results that you have achieved at each of your previous jobs. Use bullet points. Paragraphs are acceptable. However, I highly recommend bullet points because they are easier to follow.

    For each job…

    1. Start each bullet point with an action word. Action words give the impression that you will take initiative.
    2. State major accomplishments and results.
    3. List the most important accomplishments first.
    4. Exclude information that is not relevant to the job you want.
    5. Use bold font for job titles and/or company names.
    6. Sprinkle in keywords from the job description so that you are speaking the employer’s language.

    If you held more than one position at the same company, list each job title separately under the company name, and follow each job title with its own bullet points.

    Be specific about accomplishments and results

    Your goal is to tell the hiring manager what you accomplished during your prior work experience, and the results of your efforts. Show them how you can apply your work experience to add value to their organization. This section must reflect your accomplishments and results. Be specific.

    • Accomplishment = Streamlined processes
    • Result= 15% reduction in claim processing time
    • Accomplishment = Answered 90% of calls within 30 seconds
    • Result = 10% higher than performance expectations

    These examples show proven results – exactly what the hiring manager wants to see. They tell the employer that you will perform better than what is expected of you.

    Say it with…Numbers

    • 6 years of experience implementing wholesale marketing plans for two Fortune 500 corporations.
    • Received statewide recognition for exceeding sales quotas by 40%.
    • Consistently exceeded audit goals by 20% for the last 3 years.
    • Recruited, trained, and motivated 40-member marketing team at 3 locations.
    • Built client base of 230 customers, which is the highest in the company.

    Percentages

    • Restructured claims approval process, which decreased processing time by 20%.
    • Reduced product costs by 10%, while consistently adding improved product features.
    • Decreased travel expenses by 40% through monthly account reconciliation techniques.

    Dollar amounts

    • Initiated claims investigation which resulted in the recovery of $150,000 insurance overpayments.
    • Decreased advertising costs by $12,000 per year through the negotiation of cost-effective contracts.
    • Saved the organization $6,000 using thorough data analysis and system upgrades.
    • Words like “first, only, best, most, highest.”
    • Only sales representative in the company to reach $100,000 in sales in one calendar year.
    • Motivated a team of 25 customer service representatives to achieve highest call center service levels in the Midwest area, 2 years in a row.
    • recruiter to hire over 65 qualified candidates in one quarter.

    Preparing and writing a resume is work. It is worth your time and effort to make it your best effort and the best representation of who you are. Good luck with your job search.

    Category: Resume Writing

    Here are steps to help you to write a cover letter.

    1. Add a letterhead at the top of the letter. Your letterhead should include your full name, address, telephone number, and email address. Some guidelines to follow when creating your letterhead:
      • Your name should be in bold 14- or 16-point font.
      • Your address and other contact information should be in normal 12-point font.
      • The font of your letterhead does not need to be Arial or Times New Roman, like the rest of your letter, but it should be professional looking and easy to read. The most important thing to remember is to include up-to-date information so that you make it easy for the employer to contact you.
      • You may want to include an extra line under the letterhead to create visual appeal and to separate the letterhead from the rest of the letter.
    1. Write the recipient’s name, address, and the date below the letterhead. It doesn’t matter whether you put the date first or last, or how many blank lines you include between them, as long as it looks professional.
      • From here on out, use 12-point Arial or Times New Roman throughout the entire letter, set your margins to one inch, and use single spacing. Be sure your font is black, and if you’re printing your letter out, use standard-sized paper (8 1/2” by 11”).
    1. Address the recipient. Be sure to refer to the recipient by his or her proper title (Mrs., Mr., Dr., etc.). If you’re not sure who the recipient is, write, “To Whom It May Concern:” or “Dear Sir or Madam”; however, it is always best to address a cover letter to a real person to make it look like you’re not sending form letters.
    2. State your purpose in the first paragraph. Tell the employer why you are writing to them in two or three sentences. State the position for which you are applying (or the one you would like to have should it become available).
      • You don’t necessarily need to include how you became aware of the position unless it was through a mutual contact or recruiting program—in which case you should make the most of the connection.
      • If you are writing a letter of interest (also known as a prospecting or inquiry letter) in which you are asking about positions that might be available, specify why you are interested in working for the employer.
    1. Outline your qualifications in the middle paragraph(s). Make sure to match them to the requirements of the position. If you are writing to inquire about open positions, tell the employer how you can contribute to their bottom line, not what you want to get out of the deal. To do this, use what you have researched about the employer’s background and history.
      • Make your qualifications jump out at the reader by researching the company to which you are applying for a job and tailoring your letter accordingly. This will also be useful if you get an interview. Some questions to keep in mind as you write are
        • What is the employer’s mission? What do they promote as the one thing that sets them apart from their competitors?
        • What kind of customer base does the employer have? Who is their target audience?
        • What is the company’s history? Who founded it? How has the business evolved? What are the main highlights of the company’s performance over the past few years?
    1. Include a positive statement or question in the final paragraph that will motivate the employer to contact you. Make this closing paragraph between two to four sentences. Direct the employer to your enclosed resume and make sure you specify that you’re available for an interview. Finish off by thanking the recruiter for their time and consideration, and welcome them to get in touch with you to continue the conversation.
    1.  “Respectfully,” or “Regards,” leave several spaces, and print your name.
    1. Add your signature. If you will be submitting your cover letter digitally, it’s a good idea to scan and add your signature, write it in with a digital writing pad, or make a digital signature stamp with appropriate software.
    2. Make a notation of the enclosures. If you enclose something, such as a resume, with a letter, you should indicate that the letter contains enclosures by making the notation “Enclosure” or “Enclosures” at the bottom of the letter.

    Review Your Cover Letter

    1. Spell-check
    2. Read your letter aloud to hear how it reads.

    Checklist for Preparing Your Cover Letter

    1. Double-check some of the most-overlooked basics before you do anything. While misspelling or misidentifying the name of the company you’re applying to isn’t the end of the world, it’s not exactly starting off on the right foot. Double-check the following:
      • The complete name of the company to which you are applying for a job
      • The name of the person to whom you are addressing the cover letter
      • The address of the person to whom you are sending the letter
      • The title of the job for which you are applying and/or its reference number, if it exists

     

    1. Ask yourself what skills do you possess that you are not using enough in your current role. Would the ideal candidate for this new role be required to make more use of those types of skills? What opportunities are missing in your current role? Answering these questions will help you explain why you are interested in leaving current position. For example, are you looking for:
      • “room for advancement”
      • “an opportunity to learn new skills”

     

    1. Hammer down your current job or educational position. This may seem like an obvious question, but knowing how to clearly define your current role is a tremendous asset. For example, you could be a:
      • “graduate student in environmental science”
      • “customer service professional specializing in the high-end retail market”

     

    1. Provide a general description of your accomplishments/experiences in the field to which you are applying. For example, you could have:
      • “fifteen years of excellent customer service experience”
      • “an outstanding background in scientific research and discovery”
      • “a solid history of dependability in the automotive industry”
    1. Identify the assets can you offer to the company to which you are applying. List a few in your cover letter, such as:
      • “extensive experience with start-ups”
      • “demonstrated ability to solve problems”
      • “refined ability to manage teams”
      • What will you help the company accomplish, if given the job you desire?
      • “increase its bottom line”
      • “meet its goal of providing only the best in customer service”
      • “expand its customer base and increase its revenue”
    1. Specify the type of job or level of the position you are seeking. Is it:
      • “entry-level”
      • “management”
      • “senior level”

     

    Category: Resume Writing

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Job Interview

    First ask yourself the following questions:

    Did you improve processes? Did you expand the business?
    Did you oversee a special project? Did you attract new customers?
    Did you save the company money? Did you increase profitability or productivity?
    Did you resolve a specific problem? Did you win any awards or receive any special recognition?
    Did you exceed performance expectations? Did you take initiative?
    Did you received any special recognition? Did you do anything better than anyone else could?
    Did you make the company money? Did you earn a promotion?
    Did you make the company more competitive? Did you go above and beyond?
    Did you set yourself apart from others? Did you supervise employees?

    In order to be successful, please clarify the following items for your resume:

    • Focused on a specific job or career field.
    • A clear overview of what you have accomplished.
    • An answer to the question, “What makes you qualified for this position?”
    • Tailored to fit the position you applied for.

    Steps to accomplish the preparation:

    Decide what type of job you are interested in. Your resume must clearly identify the type of job you want and the career field you want to work in. Be specific. If your resume is vague, the recruiter or hiring manager is not likely to call you.

    Write down everything you can think of regarding your past work experience. Take your time to make sure you remember everything that you have done so far in your career. It does not have to be perfect at this time.

    Write down everything that comes to mind. You can prioritize and word smith later. The purpose right now is to gather as much information as possible You should include the following

    • Previous jobs
    • Duties performed at each job
    • Skills used to perform the duties at each job
    • Highest level of education
    • Certificates / Licenses
    • Skills
    • Strengths
    • Accomplishments
    • Awards and recognition that you have received
    • Professional organizations of which you are a member
    • Volunteer Experience
    • Other skills

    Now select the items that apply to the position or career you have selected.

    The items you selected from your list will be the basis for your resume.

    Category: Resume Writing

    Goal of a resume is to land an interview.  Following are tips for success resume writing.

    1. Use active verbs in a telegraphic (verb first) style to describe the responsibilities you had in a particular job.
    2. The resume always has to reflect who you are so take suggestions from others and use what works for you.
    3. Always customize your resume for a particular job description. This would include the summary as well as the body of the resume. For some jobs you will highlight some responsibilities and some accomplishments and modify when applying for a different job.
    4. The resume should only be 2 pages at a maximum. Someone just graduating from school may only have 1 page.
    5. The body of the resume should be responsibilities and accomplishments. You should quantify both if possible.

    6. Examples


    Responsibilities

    Managed the network department

    Vs

    Managed the Verizon network staff of 15 people with an annual budget of $750,000.  This is a much stronger statement.

    Accomplishments

    • Reduced operating budget vs
    • Reduced operating budget from $1.2m to $750,000 while improving system up time to 98%.

    7. Replace your Objective with Career Summary

    8. Fonts Size Use 10 – 12 – Font Type – Use time tested font types such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Georgia

    9. Margins Adequate “white space” on all four sides to create a clean and readable look.

    • Space for the interviewer to make notes on the page.
    • Fitting all the content on one page (when appropriate).
    • In most cases, margins should be no less than a half inch and no greater than 1¼ inches, depending on the format you choose.
    Category: Resume Writing

    DO

    DO use spell check every time you update your resume. One simple typo can ruin your chances of getting hired.

    Do modify your resume to reflect job description.

    DO substitute passive words with action words.

    DO use a dictionary to look up words if you are unsure of their meaning.

    DO spell out words instead of using abbreviations.

    DO be consistent:

    • If you capitalize one section heading, capitalize them all.
    • If you use bold font for one job title, use bold for all job titles.
    • If you double space between the first two jobs, double space between the second and third, and so forth.
    • Continue the same pattern throughout.

    DO tailor your resume to the specific position you are applying for. For example: If you are applying for a management position, make sure the content of your resume is related to management.

    If your resume focuses on customer service, but you are applying for a management job, you will not be considered for the position.

    DO focus on accomplishments and successes, not just duties and responsibilities of your current and past employment.

    DO be honest.

    DO update your resume on a regular basis.

    Do use positive thesaurus  –  http://www.positivethesaurus.com/p/positive-adjectives.html

    Do ask someone to proofread your resume and cover letter

    DON’T

    Use personal pronouns (I, me, my)

    Include personal information (race, age, marital status, or hobbies).

    Include references

    Exaggerate. This can be perceived as lying.

    Include salary information.

     

     

    Category: Resume Writing
  • I see you don’t monetize your blog, don’t waste your traffic, you can earn extra bucks every month because you’ve got
    hi quality content. If you want to know how to make extra money, search for: Boorfe’s tips best adsense alternative

  • I think your website needs some fresh articles. Writing manually takes a lot of time, but
    there is tool for this boring task, search for; Ssundee
    advices unlimited content for any blog

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Please review section of resume preparation before you begin to write your resume. Please review the Resume top 10 tips.

    Sections of a Resume Includes:

    1. Contact Information
    2. Resume Statement
    3. Resume Objective
    4. Career Summary
    5. Work Experience – Body of the resume
    6. Education
    7. Optional Sections
    8. Skills
    9. Accomplishments
    10. Honors and Awards
    11. Professional Associations/Volunteer Experience

    John Smith

    4211 Wayward Drive

    Marietta, Ga. 300066

    770-551-5512

    John.Smith@gmail.com

    www.linkedin.com/JSmith

    Professional Summary

    Summarize your background and qualifications in terms of how they can benefit the employer and the job in no more than about three sentences or bullet points. Refer to and use words included in the job description.

    1. Work Experience, or Skills and Abilities.
    2. With a chronological resume, list work experience in reverse order to make recent experience the most relevant.
    3. With a functional resume, organize skills and abilities by type. For example, include subsections such as “Accounting,” “Organization and Planning” and “Customer Service and Support.”

    Body of resume: What does it look like?

    Keep the following statement in the front of your mind:

    1. This section must be relevant to your target position.
    2. You should modify your responsibilities and accomplishments to reflect the job description.
    3. Include the following information for each of your previous employers:
    • Company name, Job title, Location (city and state), Employment dates (start date and end date in MM/YYYY format). If there are gaps in your employment dates, be prepared to explain them in a job interview (or explain them in your cover letter).
    • Major accomplishments and results that you have achieved at each of your previous jobs. Use bullet points. Paragraphs are acceptable. However, I highly recommend bullet points because they are easier to follow.

    For each job…

    1. Start each bullet point with an action word. Action words give the impression that you will take initiative.
    2. State major accomplishments and results.
    3. List the most important accomplishments first.
    4. Exclude information that is not relevant to the job you want.
    5. Use bold font for job titles and/or company names.
    6. Sprinkle in keywords from the job description so that you are speaking the employer’s language.

    If you held more than one position at the same company, list each job title separately under the company name, and follow each job title with its own bullet points.

    Be specific about accomplishments and results

    Your goal is to tell the hiring manager what you accomplished during your prior work experience, and the results of your efforts. Show them how you can apply your work experience to add value to their organization. This section must reflect your accomplishments and results. Be specific.

    • Accomplishment = Streamlined processes
    • Result= 15% reduction in claim processing time
    • Accomplishment = Answered 90% of calls within 30 seconds
    • Result = 10% higher than performance expectations

    These examples show proven results – exactly what the hiring manager wants to see. They tell the employer that you will perform better than what is expected of you.

    Say it with…Numbers

    • 6 years of experience implementing wholesale marketing plans for two Fortune 500 corporations.
    • Received statewide recognition for exceeding sales quotas by 40%.
    • Consistently exceeded audit goals by 20% for the last 3 years.
    • Recruited, trained, and motivated 40-member marketing team at 3 locations.
    • Built client base of 230 customers, which is the highest in the company.

    Percentages

    • Restructured claims approval process, which decreased processing time by 20%.
    • Reduced product costs by 10%, while consistently adding improved product features.
    • Decreased travel expenses by 40% through monthly account reconciliation techniques.

    Dollar amounts

    • Initiated claims investigation which resulted in the recovery of $150,000 insurance overpayments.
    • Decreased advertising costs by $12,000 per year through the negotiation of cost-effective contracts.
    • Saved the organization $6,000 using thorough data analysis and system upgrades.
    • Words like “first, only, best, most, highest.”
    • Only sales representative in the company to reach $100,000 in sales in one calendar year.
    • Motivated a team of 25 customer service representatives to achieve highest call center service levels in the Midwest area, 2 years in a row.
    • recruiter to hire over 65 qualified candidates in one quarter.

    Preparing and writing a resume is work. It is worth your time and effort to make it your best effort and the best representation of who you are. Good luck with your job search.

    Category: Resume Writing

    Here are steps to help you to write a cover letter.

    1. Add a letterhead at the top of the letter. Your letterhead should include your full name, address, telephone number, and email address. Some guidelines to follow when creating your letterhead:
      • Your name should be in bold 14- or 16-point font.
      • Your address and other contact information should be in normal 12-point font.
      • The font of your letterhead does not need to be Arial or Times New Roman, like the rest of your letter, but it should be professional looking and easy to read. The most important thing to remember is to include up-to-date information so that you make it easy for the employer to contact you.
      • You may want to include an extra line under the letterhead to create visual appeal and to separate the letterhead from the rest of the letter.
    1. Write the recipient’s name, address, and the date below the letterhead. It doesn’t matter whether you put the date first or last, or how many blank lines you include between them, as long as it looks professional.
      • From here on out, use 12-point Arial or Times New Roman throughout the entire letter, set your margins to one inch, and use single spacing. Be sure your font is black, and if you’re printing your letter out, use standard-sized paper (8 1/2” by 11”).
    1. Address the recipient. Be sure to refer to the recipient by his or her proper title (Mrs., Mr., Dr., etc.). If you’re not sure who the recipient is, write, “To Whom It May Concern:” or “Dear Sir or Madam”; however, it is always best to address a cover letter to a real person to make it look like you’re not sending form letters.
    2. State your purpose in the first paragraph. Tell the employer why you are writing to them in two or three sentences. State the position for which you are applying (or the one you would like to have should it become available).
      • You don’t necessarily need to include how you became aware of the position unless it was through a mutual contact or recruiting program—in which case you should make the most of the connection.
      • If you are writing a letter of interest (also known as a prospecting or inquiry letter) in which you are asking about positions that might be available, specify why you are interested in working for the employer.
    1. Outline your qualifications in the middle paragraph(s). Make sure to match them to the requirements of the position. If you are writing to inquire about open positions, tell the employer how you can contribute to their bottom line, not what you want to get out of the deal. To do this, use what you have researched about the employer’s background and history.
      • Make your qualifications jump out at the reader by researching the company to which you are applying for a job and tailoring your letter accordingly. This will also be useful if you get an interview. Some questions to keep in mind as you write are
        • What is the employer’s mission? What do they promote as the one thing that sets them apart from their competitors?
        • What kind of customer base does the employer have? Who is their target audience?
        • What is the company’s history? Who founded it? How has the business evolved? What are the main highlights of the company’s performance over the past few years?
    1. Include a positive statement or question in the final paragraph that will motivate the employer to contact you. Make this closing paragraph between two to four sentences. Direct the employer to your enclosed resume and make sure you specify that you’re available for an interview. Finish off by thanking the recruiter for their time and consideration, and welcome them to get in touch with you to continue the conversation.
    1.  “Respectfully,” or “Regards,” leave several spaces, and print your name.
    1. Add your signature. If you will be submitting your cover letter digitally, it’s a good idea to scan and add your signature, write it in with a digital writing pad, or make a digital signature stamp with appropriate software.
    2. Make a notation of the enclosures. If you enclose something, such as a resume, with a letter, you should indicate that the letter contains enclosures by making the notation “Enclosure” or “Enclosures” at the bottom of the letter.

    Review Your Cover Letter

    1. Spell-check
    2. Read your letter aloud to hear how it reads.

    Checklist for Preparing Your Cover Letter

    1. Double-check some of the most-overlooked basics before you do anything. While misspelling or misidentifying the name of the company you’re applying to isn’t the end of the world, it’s not exactly starting off on the right foot. Double-check the following:
      • The complete name of the company to which you are applying for a job
      • The name of the person to whom you are addressing the cover letter
      • The address of the person to whom you are sending the letter
      • The title of the job for which you are applying and/or its reference number, if it exists

     

    1. Ask yourself what skills do you possess that you are not using enough in your current role. Would the ideal candidate for this new role be required to make more use of those types of skills? What opportunities are missing in your current role? Answering these questions will help you explain why you are interested in leaving current position. For example, are you looking for:
      • “room for advancement”
      • “an opportunity to learn new skills”

     

    1. Hammer down your current job or educational position. This may seem like an obvious question, but knowing how to clearly define your current role is a tremendous asset. For example, you could be a:
      • “graduate student in environmental science”
      • “customer service professional specializing in the high-end retail market”

     

    1. Provide a general description of your accomplishments/experiences in the field to which you are applying. For example, you could have:
      • “fifteen years of excellent customer service experience”
      • “an outstanding background in scientific research and discovery”
      • “a solid history of dependability in the automotive industry”
    1. Identify the assets can you offer to the company to which you are applying. List a few in your cover letter, such as:
      • “extensive experience with start-ups”
      • “demonstrated ability to solve problems”
      • “refined ability to manage teams”
      • What will you help the company accomplish, if given the job you desire?
      • “increase its bottom line”
      • “meet its goal of providing only the best in customer service”
      • “expand its customer base and increase its revenue”
    1. Specify the type of job or level of the position you are seeking. Is it:
      • “entry-level”
      • “management”
      • “senior level”

     

    Category: Resume Writing

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Networking

    First ask yourself the following questions:

    Did you improve processes? Did you expand the business?
    Did you oversee a special project? Did you attract new customers?
    Did you save the company money? Did you increase profitability or productivity?
    Did you resolve a specific problem? Did you win any awards or receive any special recognition?
    Did you exceed performance expectations? Did you take initiative?
    Did you received any special recognition? Did you do anything better than anyone else could?
    Did you make the company money? Did you earn a promotion?
    Did you make the company more competitive? Did you go above and beyond?
    Did you set yourself apart from others? Did you supervise employees?

    In order to be successful, please clarify the following items for your resume:

    • Focused on a specific job or career field.
    • A clear overview of what you have accomplished.
    • An answer to the question, “What makes you qualified for this position?”
    • Tailored to fit the position you applied for.

    Steps to accomplish the preparation:

    Decide what type of job you are interested in. Your resume must clearly identify the type of job you want and the career field you want to work in. Be specific. If your resume is vague, the recruiter or hiring manager is not likely to call you.

    Write down everything you can think of regarding your past work experience. Take your time to make sure you remember everything that you have done so far in your career. It does not have to be perfect at this time.

    Write down everything that comes to mind. You can prioritize and word smith later. The purpose right now is to gather as much information as possible You should include the following

    • Previous jobs
    • Duties performed at each job
    • Skills used to perform the duties at each job
    • Highest level of education
    • Certificates / Licenses
    • Skills
    • Strengths
    • Accomplishments
    • Awards and recognition that you have received
    • Professional organizations of which you are a member
    • Volunteer Experience
    • Other skills

    Now select the items that apply to the position or career you have selected.

    The items you selected from your list will be the basis for your resume.

    Category: Resume Writing

    Goal of a resume is to land an interview.  Following are tips for success resume writing.

    1. Use active verbs in a telegraphic (verb first) style to describe the responsibilities you had in a particular job.
    2. The resume always has to reflect who you are so take suggestions from others and use what works for you.
    3. Always customize your resume for a particular job description. This would include the summary as well as the body of the resume. For some jobs you will highlight some responsibilities and some accomplishments and modify when applying for a different job.
    4. The resume should only be 2 pages at a maximum. Someone just graduating from school may only have 1 page.
    5. The body of the resume should be responsibilities and accomplishments. You should quantify both if possible.

    6. Examples


    Responsibilities

    Managed the network department

    Vs

    Managed the Verizon network staff of 15 people with an annual budget of $750,000.  This is a much stronger statement.

    Accomplishments

    • Reduced operating budget vs
    • Reduced operating budget from $1.2m to $750,000 while improving system up time to 98%.

    7. Replace your Objective with Career Summary

    8. Fonts Size Use 10 – 12 – Font Type – Use time tested font types such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Georgia

    9. Margins Adequate “white space” on all four sides to create a clean and readable look.

    • Space for the interviewer to make notes on the page.
    • Fitting all the content on one page (when appropriate).
    • In most cases, margins should be no less than a half inch and no greater than 1¼ inches, depending on the format you choose.
    Category: Resume Writing

    DO

    DO use spell check every time you update your resume. One simple typo can ruin your chances of getting hired.

    Do modify your resume to reflect job description.

    DO substitute passive words with action words.

    DO use a dictionary to look up words if you are unsure of their meaning.

    DO spell out words instead of using abbreviations.

    DO be consistent:

    • If you capitalize one section heading, capitalize them all.
    • If you use bold font for one job title, use bold for all job titles.
    • If you double space between the first two jobs, double space between the second and third, and so forth.
    • Continue the same pattern throughout.

    DO tailor your resume to the specific position you are applying for. For example: If you are applying for a management position, make sure the content of your resume is related to management.

    If your resume focuses on customer service, but you are applying for a management job, you will not be considered for the position.

    DO focus on accomplishments and successes, not just duties and responsibilities of your current and past employment.

    DO be honest.

    DO update your resume on a regular basis.

    Do use positive thesaurus  –  http://www.positivethesaurus.com/p/positive-adjectives.html

    Do ask someone to proofread your resume and cover letter

    DON’T

    Use personal pronouns (I, me, my)

    Include personal information (race, age, marital status, or hobbies).

    Include references

    Exaggerate. This can be perceived as lying.

    Include salary information.

     

     

    Category: Resume Writing
  • I see you don’t monetize your blog, don’t waste your traffic, you can earn extra bucks every month because you’ve got
    hi quality content. If you want to know how to make extra money, search for: Boorfe’s tips best adsense alternative

  • I think your website needs some fresh articles. Writing manually takes a lot of time, but
    there is tool for this boring task, search for; Ssundee
    advices unlimited content for any blog

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Please review section of resume preparation before you begin to write your resume. Please review the Resume top 10 tips.

    Sections of a Resume Includes:

    1. Contact Information
    2. Resume Statement
    3. Resume Objective
    4. Career Summary
    5. Work Experience – Body of the resume
    6. Education
    7. Optional Sections
    8. Skills
    9. Accomplishments
    10. Honors and Awards
    11. Professional Associations/Volunteer Experience

    John Smith

    4211 Wayward Drive

    Marietta, Ga. 300066

    770-551-5512

    John.Smith@gmail.com

    www.linkedin.com/JSmith

    Professional Summary

    Summarize your background and qualifications in terms of how they can benefit the employer and the job in no more than about three sentences or bullet points. Refer to and use words included in the job description.

    1. Work Experience, or Skills and Abilities.
    2. With a chronological resume, list work experience in reverse order to make recent experience the most relevant.
    3. With a functional resume, organize skills and abilities by type. For example, include subsections such as “Accounting,” “Organization and Planning” and “Customer Service and Support.”

    Body of resume: What does it look like?

    Keep the following statement in the front of your mind:

    1. This section must be relevant to your target position.
    2. You should modify your responsibilities and accomplishments to reflect the job description.
    3. Include the following information for each of your previous employers:
    • Company name, Job title, Location (city and state), Employment dates (start date and end date in MM/YYYY format). If there are gaps in your employment dates, be prepared to explain them in a job interview (or explain them in your cover letter).
    • Major accomplishments and results that you have achieved at each of your previous jobs. Use bullet points. Paragraphs are acceptable. However, I highly recommend bullet points because they are easier to follow.

    For each job…

    1. Start each bullet point with an action word. Action words give the impression that you will take initiative.
    2. State major accomplishments and results.
    3. List the most important accomplishments first.
    4. Exclude information that is not relevant to the job you want.
    5. Use bold font for job titles and/or company names.
    6. Sprinkle in keywords from the job description so that you are speaking the employer’s language.

    If you held more than one position at the same company, list each job title separately under the company name, and follow each job title with its own bullet points.

    Be specific about accomplishments and results

    Your goal is to tell the hiring manager what you accomplished during your prior work experience, and the results of your efforts. Show them how you can apply your work experience to add value to their organization. This section must reflect your accomplishments and results. Be specific.

    • Accomplishment = Streamlined processes
    • Result= 15% reduction in claim processing time
    • Accomplishment = Answered 90% of calls within 30 seconds
    • Result = 10% higher than performance expectations

    These examples show proven results – exactly what the hiring manager wants to see. They tell the employer that you will perform better than what is expected of you.

    Say it with…Numbers

    • 6 years of experience implementing wholesale marketing plans for two Fortune 500 corporations.
    • Received statewide recognition for exceeding sales quotas by 40%.
    • Consistently exceeded audit goals by 20% for the last 3 years.
    • Recruited, trained, and motivated 40-member marketing team at 3 locations.
    • Built client base of 230 customers, which is the highest in the company.

    Percentages

    • Restructured claims approval process, which decreased processing time by 20%.
    • Reduced product costs by 10%, while consistently adding improved product features.
    • Decreased travel expenses by 40% through monthly account reconciliation techniques.

    Dollar amounts

    • Initiated claims investigation which resulted in the recovery of $150,000 insurance overpayments.
    • Decreased advertising costs by $12,000 per year through the negotiation of cost-effective contracts.
    • Saved the organization $6,000 using thorough data analysis and system upgrades.
    • Words like “first, only, best, most, highest.”
    • Only sales representative in the company to reach $100,000 in sales in one calendar year.
    • Motivated a team of 25 customer service representatives to achieve highest call center service levels in the Midwest area, 2 years in a row.
    • recruiter to hire over 65 qualified candidates in one quarter.

    Preparing and writing a resume is work. It is worth your time and effort to make it your best effort and the best representation of who you are. Good luck with your job search.

    Category: Resume Writing

    Here are steps to help you to write a cover letter.

    1. Add a letterhead at the top of the letter. Your letterhead should include your full name, address, telephone number, and email address. Some guidelines to follow when creating your letterhead:
      • Your name should be in bold 14- or 16-point font.
      • Your address and other contact information should be in normal 12-point font.
      • The font of your letterhead does not need to be Arial or Times New Roman, like the rest of your letter, but it should be professional looking and easy to read. The most important thing to remember is to include up-to-date information so that you make it easy for the employer to contact you.
      • You may want to include an extra line under the letterhead to create visual appeal and to separate the letterhead from the rest of the letter.
    1. Write the recipient’s name, address, and the date below the letterhead. It doesn’t matter whether you put the date first or last, or how many blank lines you include between them, as long as it looks professional.
      • From here on out, use 12-point Arial or Times New Roman throughout the entire letter, set your margins to one inch, and use single spacing. Be sure your font is black, and if you’re printing your letter out, use standard-sized paper (8 1/2” by 11”).
    1. Address the recipient. Be sure to refer to the recipient by his or her proper title (Mrs., Mr., Dr., etc.). If you’re not sure who the recipient is, write, “To Whom It May Concern:” or “Dear Sir or Madam”; however, it is always best to address a cover letter to a real person to make it look like you’re not sending form letters.
    2. State your purpose in the first paragraph. Tell the employer why you are writing to them in two or three sentences. State the position for which you are applying (or the one you would like to have should it become available).
      • You don’t necessarily need to include how you became aware of the position unless it was through a mutual contact or recruiting program—in which case you should make the most of the connection.
      • If you are writing a letter of interest (also known as a prospecting or inquiry letter) in which you are asking about positions that might be available, specify why you are interested in working for the employer.
    1. Outline your qualifications in the middle paragraph(s). Make sure to match them to the requirements of the position. If you are writing to inquire about open positions, tell the employer how you can contribute to their bottom line, not what you want to get out of the deal. To do this, use what you have researched about the employer’s background and history.
      • Make your qualifications jump out at the reader by researching the company to which you are applying for a job and tailoring your letter accordingly. This will also be useful if you get an interview. Some questions to keep in mind as you write are
        • What is the employer’s mission? What do they promote as the one thing that sets them apart from their competitors?
        • What kind of customer base does the employer have? Who is their target audience?
        • What is the company’s history? Who founded it? How has the business evolved? What are the main highlights of the company’s performance over the past few years?
    1. Include a positive statement or question in the final paragraph that will motivate the employer to contact you. Make this closing paragraph between two to four sentences. Direct the employer to your enclosed resume and make sure you specify that you’re available for an interview. Finish off by thanking the recruiter for their time and consideration, and welcome them to get in touch with you to continue the conversation.
    1.  “Respectfully,” or “Regards,” leave several spaces, and print your name.
    1. Add your signature. If you will be submitting your cover letter digitally, it’s a good idea to scan and add your signature, write it in with a digital writing pad, or make a digital signature stamp with appropriate software.
    2. Make a notation of the enclosures. If you enclose something, such as a resume, with a letter, you should indicate that the letter contains enclosures by making the notation “Enclosure” or “Enclosures” at the bottom of the letter.

    Review Your Cover Letter

    1. Spell-check
    2. Read your letter aloud to hear how it reads.

    Checklist for Preparing Your Cover Letter

    1. Double-check some of the most-overlooked basics before you do anything. While misspelling or misidentifying the name of the company you’re applying to isn’t the end of the world, it’s not exactly starting off on the right foot. Double-check the following:
      • The complete name of the company to which you are applying for a job
      • The name of the person to whom you are addressing the cover letter
      • The address of the person to whom you are sending the letter
      • The title of the job for which you are applying and/or its reference number, if it exists

     

    1. Ask yourself what skills do you possess that you are not using enough in your current role. Would the ideal candidate for this new role be required to make more use of those types of skills? What opportunities are missing in your current role? Answering these questions will help you explain why you are interested in leaving current position. For example, are you looking for:
      • “room for advancement”
      • “an opportunity to learn new skills”

     

    1. Hammer down your current job or educational position. This may seem like an obvious question, but knowing how to clearly define your current role is a tremendous asset. For example, you could be a:
      • “graduate student in environmental science”
      • “customer service professional specializing in the high-end retail market”

     

    1. Provide a general description of your accomplishments/experiences in the field to which you are applying. For example, you could have:
      • “fifteen years of excellent customer service experience”
      • “an outstanding background in scientific research and discovery”
      • “a solid history of dependability in the automotive industry”
    1. Identify the assets can you offer to the company to which you are applying. List a few in your cover letter, such as:
      • “extensive experience with start-ups”
      • “demonstrated ability to solve problems”
      • “refined ability to manage teams”
      • What will you help the company accomplish, if given the job you desire?
      • “increase its bottom line”
      • “meet its goal of providing only the best in customer service”
      • “expand its customer base and increase its revenue”
    1. Specify the type of job or level of the position you are seeking. Is it:
      • “entry-level”
      • “management”
      • “senior level”

     

    Category: Resume Writing

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Job Search

    First ask yourself the following questions:

    Did you improve processes? Did you expand the business?
    Did you oversee a special project? Did you attract new customers?
    Did you save the company money? Did you increase profitability or productivity?
    Did you resolve a specific problem? Did you win any awards or receive any special recognition?
    Did you exceed performance expectations? Did you take initiative?
    Did you received any special recognition? Did you do anything better than anyone else could?
    Did you make the company money? Did you earn a promotion?
    Did you make the company more competitive? Did you go above and beyond?
    Did you set yourself apart from others? Did you supervise employees?

    In order to be successful, please clarify the following items for your resume:

    • Focused on a specific job or career field.
    • A clear overview of what you have accomplished.
    • An answer to the question, “What makes you qualified for this position?”
    • Tailored to fit the position you applied for.

    Steps to accomplish the preparation:

    Decide what type of job you are interested in. Your resume must clearly identify the type of job you want and the career field you want to work in. Be specific. If your resume is vague, the recruiter or hiring manager is not likely to call you.

    Write down everything you can think of regarding your past work experience. Take your time to make sure you remember everything that you have done so far in your career. It does not have to be perfect at this time.

    Write down everything that comes to mind. You can prioritize and word smith later. The purpose right now is to gather as much information as possible You should include the following

    • Previous jobs
    • Duties performed at each job
    • Skills used to perform the duties at each job
    • Highest level of education
    • Certificates / Licenses
    • Skills
    • Strengths
    • Accomplishments
    • Awards and recognition that you have received
    • Professional organizations of which you are a member
    • Volunteer Experience
    • Other skills

    Now select the items that apply to the position or career you have selected.

    The items you selected from your list will be the basis for your resume.

    Category: Resume Writing

    Goal of a resume is to land an interview.  Following are tips for success resume writing.

    1. Use active verbs in a telegraphic (verb first) style to describe the responsibilities you had in a particular job.
    2. The resume always has to reflect who you are so take suggestions from others and use what works for you.
    3. Always customize your resume for a particular job description. This would include the summary as well as the body of the resume. For some jobs you will highlight some responsibilities and some accomplishments and modify when applying for a different job.
    4. The resume should only be 2 pages at a maximum. Someone just graduating from school may only have 1 page.
    5. The body of the resume should be responsibilities and accomplishments. You should quantify both if possible.

    6. Examples


    Responsibilities

    Managed the network department

    Vs

    Managed the Verizon network staff of 15 people with an annual budget of $750,000.  This is a much stronger statement.

    Accomplishments

    • Reduced operating budget vs
    • Reduced operating budget from $1.2m to $750,000 while improving system up time to 98%.

    7. Replace your Objective with Career Summary

    8. Fonts Size Use 10 – 12 – Font Type – Use time tested font types such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Georgia

    9. Margins Adequate “white space” on all four sides to create a clean and readable look.

    • Space for the interviewer to make notes on the page.
    • Fitting all the content on one page (when appropriate).
    • In most cases, margins should be no less than a half inch and no greater than 1¼ inches, depending on the format you choose.
    Category: Resume Writing

    DO

    DO use spell check every time you update your resume. One simple typo can ruin your chances of getting hired.

    Do modify your resume to reflect job description.

    DO substitute passive words with action words.

    DO use a dictionary to look up words if you are unsure of their meaning.

    DO spell out words instead of using abbreviations.

    DO be consistent:

    • If you capitalize one section heading, capitalize them all.
    • If you use bold font for one job title, use bold for all job titles.
    • If you double space between the first two jobs, double space between the second and third, and so forth.
    • Continue the same pattern throughout.

    DO tailor your resume to the specific position you are applying for. For example: If you are applying for a management position, make sure the content of your resume is related to management.

    If your resume focuses on customer service, but you are applying for a management job, you will not be considered for the position.

    DO focus on accomplishments and successes, not just duties and responsibilities of your current and past employment.

    DO be honest.

    DO update your resume on a regular basis.

    Do use positive thesaurus  –  http://www.positivethesaurus.com/p/positive-adjectives.html

    Do ask someone to proofread your resume and cover letter

    DON’T

    Use personal pronouns (I, me, my)

    Include personal information (race, age, marital status, or hobbies).

    Include references

    Exaggerate. This can be perceived as lying.

    Include salary information.

     

     

    Category: Resume Writing
  • I see you don’t monetize your blog, don’t waste your traffic, you can earn extra bucks every month because you’ve got
    hi quality content. If you want to know how to make extra money, search for: Boorfe’s tips best adsense alternative

  • I think your website needs some fresh articles. Writing manually takes a lot of time, but
    there is tool for this boring task, search for; Ssundee
    advices unlimited content for any blog

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Please review section of resume preparation before you begin to write your resume. Please review the Resume top 10 tips.

    Sections of a Resume Includes:

    1. Contact Information
    2. Resume Statement
    3. Resume Objective
    4. Career Summary
    5. Work Experience – Body of the resume
    6. Education
    7. Optional Sections
    8. Skills
    9. Accomplishments
    10. Honors and Awards
    11. Professional Associations/Volunteer Experience

    John Smith

    4211 Wayward Drive

    Marietta, Ga. 300066

    770-551-5512

    John.Smith@gmail.com

    www.linkedin.com/JSmith

    Professional Summary

    Summarize your background and qualifications in terms of how they can benefit the employer and the job in no more than about three sentences or bullet points. Refer to and use words included in the job description.

    1. Work Experience, or Skills and Abilities.
    2. With a chronological resume, list work experience in reverse order to make recent experience the most relevant.
    3. With a functional resume, organize skills and abilities by type. For example, include subsections such as “Accounting,” “Organization and Planning” and “Customer Service and Support.”

    Body of resume: What does it look like?

    Keep the following statement in the front of your mind:

    1. This section must be relevant to your target position.
    2. You should modify your responsibilities and accomplishments to reflect the job description.
    3. Include the following information for each of your previous employers:
    • Company name, Job title, Location (city and state), Employment dates (start date and end date in MM/YYYY format). If there are gaps in your employment dates, be prepared to explain them in a job interview (or explain them in your cover letter).
    • Major accomplishments and results that you have achieved at each of your previous jobs. Use bullet points. Paragraphs are acceptable. However, I highly recommend bullet points because they are easier to follow.

    For each job…

    1. Start each bullet point with an action word. Action words give the impression that you will take initiative.
    2. State major accomplishments and results.
    3. List the most important accomplishments first.
    4. Exclude information that is not relevant to the job you want.
    5. Use bold font for job titles and/or company names.
    6. Sprinkle in keywords from the job description so that you are speaking the employer’s language.

    If you held more than one position at the same company, list each job title separately under the company name, and follow each job title with its own bullet points.

    Be specific about accomplishments and results

    Your goal is to tell the hiring manager what you accomplished during your prior work experience, and the results of your efforts. Show them how you can apply your work experience to add value to their organization. This section must reflect your accomplishments and results. Be specific.

    • Accomplishment = Streamlined processes
    • Result= 15% reduction in claim processing time
    • Accomplishment = Answered 90% of calls within 30 seconds
    • Result = 10% higher than performance expectations

    These examples show proven results – exactly what the hiring manager wants to see. They tell the employer that you will perform better than what is expected of you.

    Say it with…Numbers

    • 6 years of experience implementing wholesale marketing plans for two Fortune 500 corporations.
    • Received statewide recognition for exceeding sales quotas by 40%.
    • Consistently exceeded audit goals by 20% for the last 3 years.
    • Recruited, trained, and motivated 40-member marketing team at 3 locations.
    • Built client base of 230 customers, which is the highest in the company.

    Percentages

    • Restructured claims approval process, which decreased processing time by 20%.
    • Reduced product costs by 10%, while consistently adding improved product features.
    • Decreased travel expenses by 40% through monthly account reconciliation techniques.

    Dollar amounts

    • Initiated claims investigation which resulted in the recovery of $150,000 insurance overpayments.
    • Decreased advertising costs by $12,000 per year through the negotiation of cost-effective contracts.
    • Saved the organization $6,000 using thorough data analysis and system upgrades.
    • Words like “first, only, best, most, highest.”
    • Only sales representative in the company to reach $100,000 in sales in one calendar year.
    • Motivated a team of 25 customer service representatives to achieve highest call center service levels in the Midwest area, 2 years in a row.
    • recruiter to hire over 65 qualified candidates in one quarter.

    Preparing and writing a resume is work. It is worth your time and effort to make it your best effort and the best representation of who you are. Good luck with your job search.

    Category: Resume Writing

    Here are steps to help you to write a cover letter.

    1. Add a letterhead at the top of the letter. Your letterhead should include your full name, address, telephone number, and email address. Some guidelines to follow when creating your letterhead:
      • Your name should be in bold 14- or 16-point font.
      • Your address and other contact information should be in normal 12-point font.
      • The font of your letterhead does not need to be Arial or Times New Roman, like the rest of your letter, but it should be professional looking and easy to read. The most important thing to remember is to include up-to-date information so that you make it easy for the employer to contact you.
      • You may want to include an extra line under the letterhead to create visual appeal and to separate the letterhead from the rest of the letter.
    1. Write the recipient’s name, address, and the date below the letterhead. It doesn’t matter whether you put the date first or last, or how many blank lines you include between them, as long as it looks professional.
      • From here on out, use 12-point Arial or Times New Roman throughout the entire letter, set your margins to one inch, and use single spacing. Be sure your font is black, and if you’re printing your letter out, use standard-sized paper (8 1/2” by 11”).
    1. Address the recipient. Be sure to refer to the recipient by his or her proper title (Mrs., Mr., Dr., etc.). If you’re not sure who the recipient is, write, “To Whom It May Concern:” or “Dear Sir or Madam”; however, it is always best to address a cover letter to a real person to make it look like you’re not sending form letters.
    2. State your purpose in the first paragraph. Tell the employer why you are writing to them in two or three sentences. State the position for which you are applying (or the one you would like to have should it become available).
      • You don’t necessarily need to include how you became aware of the position unless it was through a mutual contact or recruiting program—in which case you should make the most of the connection.
      • If you are writing a letter of interest (also known as a prospecting or inquiry letter) in which you are asking about positions that might be available, specify why you are interested in working for the employer.
    1. Outline your qualifications in the middle paragraph(s). Make sure to match them to the requirements of the position. If you are writing to inquire about open positions, tell the employer how you can contribute to their bottom line, not what you want to get out of the deal. To do this, use what you have researched about the employer’s background and history.
      • Make your qualifications jump out at the reader by researching the company to which you are applying for a job and tailoring your letter accordingly. This will also be useful if you get an interview. Some questions to keep in mind as you write are
        • What is the employer’s mission? What do they promote as the one thing that sets them apart from their competitors?
        • What kind of customer base does the employer have? Who is their target audience?
        • What is the company’s history? Who founded it? How has the business evolved? What are the main highlights of the company’s performance over the past few years?
    1. Include a positive statement or question in the final paragraph that will motivate the employer to contact you. Make this closing paragraph between two to four sentences. Direct the employer to your enclosed resume and make sure you specify that you’re available for an interview. Finish off by thanking the recruiter for their time and consideration, and welcome them to get in touch with you to continue the conversation.
    1.  “Respectfully,” or “Regards,” leave several spaces, and print your name.
    1. Add your signature. If you will be submitting your cover letter digitally, it’s a good idea to scan and add your signature, write it in with a digital writing pad, or make a digital signature stamp with appropriate software.
    2. Make a notation of the enclosures. If you enclose something, such as a resume, with a letter, you should indicate that the letter contains enclosures by making the notation “Enclosure” or “Enclosures” at the bottom of the letter.

    Review Your Cover Letter

    1. Spell-check
    2. Read your letter aloud to hear how it reads.

    Checklist for Preparing Your Cover Letter

    1. Double-check some of the most-overlooked basics before you do anything. While misspelling or misidentifying the name of the company you’re applying to isn’t the end of the world, it’s not exactly starting off on the right foot. Double-check the following:
      • The complete name of the company to which you are applying for a job
      • The name of the person to whom you are addressing the cover letter
      • The address of the person to whom you are sending the letter
      • The title of the job for which you are applying and/or its reference number, if it exists

     

    1. Ask yourself what skills do you possess that you are not using enough in your current role. Would the ideal candidate for this new role be required to make more use of those types of skills? What opportunities are missing in your current role? Answering these questions will help you explain why you are interested in leaving current position. For example, are you looking for:
      • “room for advancement”
      • “an opportunity to learn new skills”

     

    1. Hammer down your current job or educational position. This may seem like an obvious question, but knowing how to clearly define your current role is a tremendous asset. For example, you could be a:
      • “graduate student in environmental science”
      • “customer service professional specializing in the high-end retail market”

     

    1. Provide a general description of your accomplishments/experiences in the field to which you are applying. For example, you could have:
      • “fifteen years of excellent customer service experience”
      • “an outstanding background in scientific research and discovery”
      • “a solid history of dependability in the automotive industry”
    1. Identify the assets can you offer to the company to which you are applying. List a few in your cover letter, such as:
      • “extensive experience with start-ups”
      • “demonstrated ability to solve problems”
      • “refined ability to manage teams”
      • What will you help the company accomplish, if given the job you desire?
      • “increase its bottom line”
      • “meet its goal of providing only the best in customer service”
      • “expand its customer base and increase its revenue”
    1. Specify the type of job or level of the position you are seeking. Is it:
      • “entry-level”
      • “management”
      • “senior level”

     

    Category: Resume Writing

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